Concentrated Poverty and Housing Need in Vancouver

  • Rob Fiedler Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University
  • Nadine Schuurman Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University
  • Jennifer Hyndman Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University
Keywords: Socioeconomic, census data, homelessness, recent immigrants, dasymetric mapping, postal survey, population surveillance, public policy, immigrants, poverty, housing, spatiality

Abstract

There are a number of socioeconomic phenomena that are difficult to discern using only census data. We present an innovative approach developed to discern the spatial dimensions of risk for homelessness amongst recent immigrants in Vancouver, Canada. Dasymetric mapping and a postal survey are employed to improve the resolution and utility of census data. The results illustrate the potential for developing a more nuanced understanding of the spatial dimensions of complex socioeconomic phenomena using a combination of secondary data and primary data. It is argued that higher-resolution data aids in identifying and understanding socioeconomic phenomena that are highly localized and misrepresented by coarsely aggregated data. Finally, the potential for population surveillance is discussed and weighed against the benefits for policy-makers, non-governmental organizations, and researchers.
How to Cite
Fiedler, R., Schuurman, N., & Hyndman, J. (1). Concentrated Poverty and Housing Need in Vancouver. ACME: An International Journal for Critical Geographies, 4(1), 145-171. Retrieved from https://acme-journal.org/index.php/acme/article/view/732
Section
Special Issue - Critical Cartographies