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Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.
  • File Type: The manuscript is in Word (.doc or .docx) format. Do not submit in Word Perfect format.

  • Format: Text in manuscripts should be set out in double-spaced, indented (0.5 in. or 1.27cm) paragraphs. Please use a Times font (e.g. Times, CG Times, Times New Roman), size 12. Do not include extra lines between paragraphs. (More on the manuscript details below.)

    Title Page: Include the title of your manuscript in bold capitalised text. You should also provide your name, affiliation, and contact information (including e-mail address) on a separate title page, which should be uploaded as a "supplementary file." The title of the paper should also be included on the first page of the manuscript (prior to the abstract).

    Abstract: Include an abstract of 200 words or less on the first page of the manuscript. Please make sure that this abstract is about the entire paper and not an introduction to the paper.

  • Length: The body of the text can vary in length from 1500 to 11,000 words, inclusive of footnotes, references, etc. As a general guideline, editorials, interventions, observations, and review essays tend to be shorter (1500 to 4000 words) than theoretical- and empirical-based research papers (maximum 8000 to 11,000 words).

    Type: Editorials, literature reviews, debates, pictorial essays, poetry, mini-collections on specific topics, interventions, and research papers.

    Language: Reviews of manuscripts are conducted in English, French, Italian, German, or Spanish. Manuscripts written in other languages may be accepted for review after consultation with the editors.

    Writing Style: The style that ACME advocates emphasizes clarity, accessibility, and care in writing. Manuscripts are accepted in a wide range of writing styles, e.g. informal, personal, jargonistic, story telling, academic.

    Use of Language: Manuscripts must be written in non-sexist, non-racist, non-ableist, inclusive, and anti-oppressionist language.

  • Citations: Authors should use the author-date system for citations: (Corker and French, 1999; McDowell, 1999, 96-122; Bell et al., 1994).

    Quotations: Quotations, both excerpts from other published material and from primary research (interview transcripts, for example), should be included in the text if less than 40 words. Quotations of more than 40 words should be indented (left side only) by .5" or 1.27cm, single-spaced with a line inserted both before and after the block of text. Do not use quotation marks (single or double) to mark the text.

    Figures, Tables, Illustrations: All should be in electronic format and be included in the body of the paper. Please do not use tabs. Use the table creation tool in your word processor.

    Section Headings: Use bold type for first-order section titles(i.e. Heading 1). Use type that is both bold and italic for second-order section titles (i.e. Heading 2). Use italics for third-order section headings (i.e. Heading 3). Do not indent paragraphs and begin text on the same line as third-order headings .

    Spelling: There is no spelling style preferred. Consistency within the manuscript is expected.

    Punctuation: Standard punctuation is expected. Use "..." for ellipses — in quotes to indicate that part of the quote is missing and in the text to indicate a pause.

    Permission: Obtaining copyright permission for reproductions is the responsibility of the author(s). Due acknowledgement is expected.

    Acknowledgments: Acknowledgments are to be included at the end of the body of the text, before the list of references.

    Footnotes: Footnotes are to be used sparingly and placed at the bottom of the page. Use the word processing feature for creating footnotes. Please use Arabic numerals.

  • References:

    List references alphabetically at the end of the manuscript.

    For more than one entry with same author(s) and date, use letters to distinguish them, e.g. 1999a, 1999b, 1999c.

    Arrange entries under a particular author's name chronologically, with the most recent listed first.

    All authors' names are to be part of the entry.

    Examples:

    Bell, David, Jon Binnie, Julia Cream and Gill Valentine. 1994. All hyped up and no place to go. Gender, Place & Culture 1, 31-47.

    Corker, Mairian and Sally French (eds). 1999. Disability Discourse. London: Open University Press.

    Dyck, Isabel. 2002. Embodied knowledge in place: Body, gender, and space in immigration research. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers, Belfast, January.

    Gibson-Graham, J.K. 1997. Postmodern becomings: From the space of form to the space of potentiality. In, Georges Benko & Ulf Strohmayer (eds.), Space and Social Theory: Interpreting Modernity and Postmodernity. Oxford: Blackwell, pp. 306-23.

    Klein, Melanie. 1946/1991. Notes on some schizoid mechanisms. In, Juliet Mitchell (ed.), The Selected Melanie Klein. London: Penguin, pp. 175-200.

    McDowell, Linda (ed.) 1999. Gender, Identity & Place. London: Polity Press.

Author Guidelines

ACME publishes critical work on place and space,including anarchist, anti-racist, autonomist, decolonial, environmentalist, feminist, Marxist, non-representational, postcolonial, poststructuralist, queer, situationist, and socialist perspectives. Analyses that are critical are understood to be part of the praxis of social and political change aimed at challenging, dismantling, and transforming prevalent relations, systems, and structures of colonialism, exploitation, oppression, imperialism, state aggression, environmental destruction, and neoliberalism

Manuscripts submitted should not exceed 11,000 words, inclusive of abstract, footnotes, references, and acknowlegements.

All submissions are through our online Open Journal System submissions page. Questions about the scope and focus of the journal, the review process, or any other can be directed to our editorial collective:

acmegeography@gmail.com

*Note that editors can answer general questions, but cannot preview or approve manuscripts prior to submission.

Submissions should include a separate title page with all authors' names and affiliations, an abstract of no more than 200 words, and a list of four to six keywords for indexing. To facilitate a closed review process, if that is preferred, please upload your title page as a supplementary file, and remove any names or identifiers from your manuscript. Please ensure that any maps, photos, graphs, or charts included are of high resolution and good quality.

Supplementary files can be submitted along with the manuscript. These might include research tools, data-sets, or creative works. Supplementary files are intended to enhance the readers' engagement with the primary submission.

As a measure of reciprocity, authors whose papers are accepted for publication in ACME agree to participate in the peer review process that is necessary for the journal's operation. In this regard, we ask that you will be willing to complete a minimum of 2 peer reviews per published article. By agreeing to have your paper published in ACME, you also explicitly agree to these terms.

Reference Examples:

Bell, David, Jon Binnie, Julia Cream and Gill Valentine. 1994. All hyped up and no place to go. Gender, Place & Culture 1, 31-47.

Corker, Mairian and Sally French (eds). 1999. Disability Discourse. London: Open University Press.

Dyck, Isabel. 2002. Embodied knowledge in place: Body, gender, and space in immigration research. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers, Belfast, January.

Gibson-Graham, J.K. 1997. Postmodern becomings: From the space of form to the space of potentiality. In, Georges Benko & Ulf Strohmayer (eds.), Space and Social Theory: Interpreting Modernity and Postmodernity. Oxford: Blackwell, pp. 306-23.

Klein, Melanie. 1946/1991. Notes on some schizoid mechanisms. In, Juliet Mitchell (ed.), The Selected Melanie Klein. London: Penguin, pp. 175-200.

McDowell, Linda (ed.) 1999. Gender, Identity & Place. London: Polity Press.

SPECIAL ISSUE AND THEMED SECTIONS:

ACME has a long-standing tradition of publishing special issues and themed sections. Please check back issues to get a sense of what we publish. Below we have answered some questions regarding the process of submitting, evaluating and managing a special issue.

How to submit a proposal for a special issue or themed section?

We do not have specific rules for submitting a special issue/themed section but it needs to provide at least:

  1. Title of special issue/themed section
  2. Name(s) of guest editor(s), affiliations and email contacts
  3. Rationale for the special issue/themed section. Explain if for example comes from a conference session or briefly the background for this collection. Situate the special issue/themed section briefly within the literature and explain why it is important to publish this in a journal such as ACME
  4. Proposed papers. Provide the titles of paper, names of authors, affiliations and contact details. Provide also a 200-word abstract for each proposed paper.
  5. Proposed timetable: Please provide a timetable for the submission of your special issue/themed section and explain at what stage the papers are at the time of sending the proposal.

What happens when a special issue/themed section is submitted?

A special issue/themed section proposal can be submitted to any members of the editorial collective or any administrative email addresses. The ACME Editorial Collective will share the proposal by email and discuss whether it is something that ACME would like to publish. Often the collective will have questions or suggestions on how to improve the proposal. Once the proposal is satisfactory, the special issue/themed section will be assigned to a member of the editorial collective depending on workloads and language competency. As special issue/themed section editor you will be in touch with this assigned editor with updates and finally with the submission of the papers.

What is the role of a special issue/themed section “guest editor”?

The main role of a special issue/themed section “guest editor” is to be the contact point between the assigned ACME editor (and any editorial assistants) and the authors of the special issue/themed section and to help manage the process of handling manuscripts. The ACME assigned editor remains in charge of the editorial decisions but they might solicit advice at certain points in the process.

The following are the actions that we expect a special issue/themed section “guest editor” will be involved with:

  1. Submitting the whole special issue to the ACME assigned editor
  2. Recommending, if requested by the ACME editor, a list of possible referees.
  3. Providing a second opinion, if requested by the ACME assigned editor, on the editorial decision once the referee reports have been received
  4. Making sure that the authors understand accurately what is expected from the corrections and liaise between the author and the ACME assigned editor about any necessary clarifications.
  5. Remind and chase authors to complete revisions
  6. Provide help, if requested by the ACME editor, with final proof reading

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